Newfoundland Dog Characteristics Temperament Health Training


newfoundland dog

Description of Newfoundland Dog breed:

A woman standing in front of a window

Newfoundland Dogs are giant-sized dogs that have lustrous coats with three colors being common – black, brown, and white. The average height for an adult male Newfoundland dog is 26-29 inches tall at the shoulders while the females are 24-27 inches tall. Newfoundland Dogs can weigh between 130 and 150 pounds. Newfoundland Dogs have massive heads and jaws, but they do not possess an under-bite as many would imagine. The Newfoundland’s tail is long and heavy and is completely covered with straight hair. The Newfoundland dog breed has webbed feet which are often why they are so good at water rescue work etc…

Newfoundland dogs enjoy fun activities such as walks, swimming, playing ball or Frisbee, hiking rough countrysides, and running off-leash where it is safe to do so. Newfoundland Dog training must begin early on in life by socializing this dog breed with other pets and people of all ages – especially children because Newfoundland Dog temperaments tend to be gentle and good with kids. Newfoundland Dogs are not recommended for first-time dog owners because of their size and strength, but with proper Newfoundland Dog training, they can make a great pet for the right family.

Newfoundland Dog temperament:

A large body of water with a mountain in the background

The Newfoundland dog is known as being one of the friendliest, most patient, and gentlest dogs around. They have a great sense of humor and love to play jokes on people (or other animals). Newfoundland Dogs are not barkers unless there is a real need, preferring to use their deep-throated bay instead. They are excellent swimmers and will instinctively rescue people or things in danger. Newfoundland Dogs are loyal to their families and make great watchdogs.

Health Issues Common to Newfoundland Dogs:

Hip Dysplasia and Newfoundland Dog bloat. Newfoundland Dog Hip Dysplasia is an inherited disease that affects Newfoundland dog’s hips – this can be detected with hip x-rays taken by your Newfoundland dog breeder who should be able to help you find the best Newfoundland dog for sale to fit your family’s needs. Newfoundland Dog Bloat is also known as Newfoundland bloat, stomach torsion, twisted stomach, or GDV (gastric dilatation-volvulus). This condition occurs when the Newfoundland Dog’s stomach fills with air and twists. If it does not twist and untwist quickly enough, parts of the stomach die due to a lack of blood supply, and the condition becomes very critical in nature. Newfoundland Dog bloat often affects Newfoundland Dog large-breed dogs.

Newfoundland Dog Training:

As previously mentioned, Newfoundland Dogs are not recommended for first-time Newfoundland dog owners because of their size and strength. Newfoundland Dog training must begin early on in life by socializing with other pets and people of all ages – especially children because Newfoundland Temperaments tend to be gentle and good with kids. Newfoundland Dogs have a lower energy level than some other big breeds so they will do well in any home environment providing they get enough exercise, but this is important in Newfoundland Dog training. Newfoundlands also require early training to help them learn how to properly behave around children without becoming overprotective towards them. Dogs are generally patient, good-natured, and intelligent animals that can be easily trained with Newfoundland Dog training. They respond best to a calm but firm leader who uses positive reinforcement in Newfoundland dog training methods.

That concludes our article on Newfoundland Dogs. Thank you for reading! For more information on other dog breeds, please visit our website or blog.

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